#Publishing: What is Psychological Suspense?

What is psychological suspense? What is any genre, for that matter? Hybrid-genre or cross-genre authors seem to be more prevalent among self-published than traditionally published authors. More power to a writer who can successfully merge genres to create a gothic-steampunk-paranormal-mystery-romance, but chances are a story attempting to do so is going to have some issues when it comes to marketability. Published titles stand a much better chance of finding a readership when their content fits predominately within a single genre. In publishing, genre matters. It’s foolish to think otherwise as the writing of books is also about implementing good business practices. 

 

In my own creative writing, I’ve veered toward literary fiction in the past. Some would argue that’s not a genre per se. That term and others like young adult, fiction, and nonfiction function as categories that communicate to a reader if the writing is true or not and possibly the age range of the intended reader. Genre on the other hand communicates expectations of a book’s content and targeted audience. When a reader picks up a romance, western, or thriller they do so with an inkling of what to expect from the plot and characters.

 

What is Psychological Suspense?

“Where does your book belong on a store shelf?” Literary agents asked that question a lot at the PNWA writing conference I attended a few years ago. Whether a writer plans to put their work on a real shelf, or a virtual shelf, they owe it to themselves to know to what other published authors their work can be compared. I shelved that first novel of mine when life threw some curveballs my way, but I have decided to dust off the opening chapters this year to submit to some writing contests that offer critical feedback as part of the submission fee. After a lot of soul searching, I’ve concluded psychological suspense fits my tendencies as a fiction writer. Knowing that will help guide future writing attempts.

 

Image of neurons

 

Too many writers going for a psychological slant with shades of thriller or horror thrown in tend to compare themselves to Stephen King. Such assertions sound great, but it’s better for a given author pitching their book to look at the specific authors each agent represents. Of if the decision is made to self-publishing, an author should still spend a sizable chunk of time exploring comparable titles in their given genre.

 

While pitching my novel, I used Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl as a comparison since the husband and wife in her book share similarities with the married couple in my novel. Luckily, the pitch sessions were only four minutes long. Otherwise, I would not have been able to offer many more comparable titles give my lack of research. Perhaps The Girl on the Train or The Lovely Bones are viable comparisons. It irks me to no end that my working title of Lost Girl Road was in existence long before numerous books hit the market with the word girl in them.

 

What The Hell Am I Writing?

Even though I pinpointed the importance of genre in an earlier post, my explorations continue in earnest. I know my strengths and weaknesses as a writer. Do you? Paradoxically, the positives of having earned two English degrees, also equates to having read lots of highbrow, noncommercial literature that general readers don’t necessarily flock to devour.

 

My literary side wants to craft a great story, but my competitive side wants to write a story that fulfills readers’ wants. This is why genre matters!

 

A discussion panel of mystery writers that I sat in on, put it this way: A mystery focuses on who done it and a thriller revolves around how to stop it.

 

Great. Just absolutely friggin’ great. Lost Girl Road does neither.

 

Image of bloody handprint on book

Voila! Say Hello to Psychological Suspense …

Information on the genre of psychological suspense is not too bountiful. How appropriate that I have picked a genre more popular that is more popular in Britain and the rest of Europe than in America. My best guess it would be marketed with psychological thrillers in the United States, or perhaps under the more general umbrella of psychological fiction.

 

In any case, the blog 2 Blowhards offers a great definition of psychological suspense. I highly encourage you to read the entire article.

Keep in mind that it isn’t a mystery-fiction subgenre; it’s really best thought of as a crime-fiction subgenre. That helps take some weight off the idea of “mystery.” Its main characteristic, though, is it generally uses a crime as a pretext for opportunities to look into personality and sociology. There’s a murder or a kidnapping, sure–but often in psychological suspense you know from the outset who did it. Ie., from a mystery point of view, there’s pointedly no mystery. And often the central character, if there is one, isn’t the investigator but the criminal.

In the crime-fiction world, these fictions are sometimes referred to not as whodunnits but as whydunnits… Psychological suspense is (roughly) “the story of a crime, not the story of the tracking down of a criminal.” …Suspense? Well, kindasorta. But seldom of the rushing-to-a-breathless-climax sort. There’s often a tone of dread or malignity… The suspense is more a matter of sustaining a tone than of building to anything.

 

Which novels on your reading list would you classify as psychological suspense? What thoughts do you have on the importance of genre in general? Have you ever shelved a big writing project only to return to it years later?

 

 

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Photo Credit: Network Neurons 1 by gerard79

 

Photo Credit: Diary After Murder by truemitra

 

Please share responsibly. Jeri Walker, 2017.

Author: Jeri Walker

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81 Comments

  1. I love psychological suspense!
    For me the key distinction is PSYCHOLOGICAL… in psychological suspense, (mysteries & thrillers) keeping the scary stuff contained (less blood, less gore, more fear) is the essence of the appeal. A police procedural focuses on how to catch the killer. A mystery can be a whodunnit or a WHY-dunnit (more motive, less fingerprint powder), but suspense has jeopardy.

    I struggle a great deal with genres and, at least for now, I’ve decided to think of genre categories primarily as marketing issues. If you figure it out, if you find a better approach, please clue me in.

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    • Candy, you have such knowledge of mysteries. I really enjoy the way you keep your blog posts so focused on posts that mystery fans will find appealing. In the end, there are so many different ways to meet criteria for this or that genre. It can get a little mind-boggling.

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  2. I like the idea of using the criminal’s point of view. It would put a big twist in the plot. I’ll have to keep that in mind. As a novice writer, I’m still in the mode of finding what I want to write about. Thank you for this idea.

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    • Glynis, it’s good that you’re taking the time to explore what genre best suits you. Too often, I read genre books and get the sense the writer has not branched out much in their reading, and then their story starts to feel like a knock-off of a knock-off. Reading and writing widely will be something that will certainly pay off for you in the long run.

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  3. Psychological suspense sounds like a great read. Putting your work in any one genre feels so constricting, and yet I know we must for most readers need that genre commitment of us to choose, or not, to pick up our book.
    It’s a great post of yours this one and one that makes me realise I should decide on what genre my own work is.

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    • Lucy, I think I really struggle with wanting to be literary but realizing what I am attempting with my WIP is commercial fiction. Lost Girl Road aligns itself with psychological suspense more than any other genre I’ve come across, and I do like focusing on characters who are a bit on the dark side. Your current book will most likely fit the confines of more than one genre, but when it comes to reaching the right readers, it will be helpful when it comes to marketing. Otherwise, the wrong readers won’t “get” your book like the “right” readers will.

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  4. I am terrible with figuring out genre. Sometimes you would think it would be easy based on setting, but that alone doesn’t necessarily dictate how the story itself plays out.

    I am a fan of psychological horror and suspense more than gore and shock value. Granted I do enjoy a bit of gore from time to time as well. But you should always have a strong story backbone to support it.

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    • Jon, setting definitely has its place in various genres. The more I read, the more I learn about the expectations readers will have of certain genres. Which I guess is why I avoid some like the plague.

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  5. Genre is totally out of my realm of knowledge. Fiction versus non-fiction I get. Yeah, I know. I am not much help. BTW – I can’t believe I actually found another person who uses the word ‘friggin’. I am not as lonely as I thought. 🙂

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  6. LOL, this was a pretty good definition “A mystery focuses on who done it and a thriller revolves around how to stop it.” – never thought about it.

    I am so bad with figuring out genre – books and movies alike. I like those which make me think, analyze and fear in the same time. I don’t like blood baths but i do like murder investigation, a lot more if there’s behavior analysis involved. So from what i read, psychological suspense might just be it 😉

    On a side note, i have never thought about it before i ‘met’ you, Jeri – but writing a book is SO MUCH MORE than simply writing the book. You are doing a great job with your writing adventures 😀

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  7. I think–think–I “get” psychological suspense. I even think I’ve written two novels in that genre (one published, one almost ready to go). But my stories frequently combine elements of crime/suspense/mystery (hardly ever stepping out of crime fiction as a whole). I wish everyone would just begin using the term “crime fiction.” It covers it all. Then the description of the book would further narrow down what it’s about. I’ve simply been calling those two books suspense, and the rest of my books mystery. For a great psychological suspense author, I recommend Ruth Rendall.

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  8. I love suspense novels of any type! I am a fan of murder mysteries, but in the last year, I have been branching out and reading other genres. I am surprised by what I am liking, these days…including gay (male/male) erotica! (I just finished reading a novella by Jamie Lynn Miller, author of said genre, and will be featuring her on my blog sometime in the upcoming months!)

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  9. Jeri – Psychological Suspense is a wonderful genre because it keeps your mind on edge and always thinking. A really good thriller will take all your emotions on a ride. 🙂

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  10. Psychological suspense doesn’t get any better, or bigger than Dostoyevsky’s [Dostoevsky] Crime and Punishment! It’s one of my top 5 favourite novels of all time and has led to a lifetime of searching psychological books. Another huge favourite is The Blindman of Seville by Robert Wilson. You are in great company Jeri. 😀

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    • Andrea, I’ll be sure to add The Blindman of Seville to my TBR list. Thanks for telling me about it.

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  11. Jeri — I read a lot of thrillers, mysteries, who dunnits. They are my escape and besides they’re a fun read. I don’t think readers buy books by “category.” I still don’t quite understand the difference between psychological suspense and a thriller.

    Readers like me are looking for something that will grab them so they can’t put the book down. That’s why the title of the book and the flap copy are critical as well as the first page of the book — at least in my view. If the title looks interesting, I will read the flap copy and if that interests me I will turn to the first page. I think you’ll find that the most successful writers grab the reader by the throat in the first few sentences, otherwise you’ve lost them.

    If the mystery (I’ll use that as an umbrella term) genre is going to be your thing, readers aren’t looking for great literature. They’re looking for suspense, twists of plot, character development. I’m reading a novel now in which the prologue gives away the story. Then the book flashes back 2-1/1 months earlier to take you down the path of how the story unfolds. In other cases, I’ll read a mystery and I can’t wait to find out who dunnit.

    It’s not one size fits all. Pick out how you’re going to approach the story and then include all the elements that will compel someone to read the book. My two cents.

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    • Jeannette, my WIP definitely has a lit of twists and turns, but I hesitate over how thrilling it is. I also get overly analytical about the quality of the writing I am trying to produce. In then end, I know I’m on the right path, and it will be exciting when I finally decide to publish.

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  12. I like psychological suspense and like Jeannette I look for books that grab me. I also like ones that make it simple to keep up with and not have to go back and forth to remember who is character. I have a feeling your book will have all the right elements that will appeal to us who like reading such books.

    So the question is are you nearer to completing it?

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    • Susan, I’m done with the first draft and have started revisions on the second. If all goes well, I will be sending it off to test readers in early 2014.

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  13. This sounds like the genre of book that I can’t put down :). I read a lot of non-fiction that I sometimes have to force myself to pick up – so maybe I need to pick up some more in this genre!

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    • Dan, isn’t that the worst? I real a lot of books (both fiction and nonfiction) that I feel like I’m forcing myself to pick-up. We should both make more of an effort to find books that allow us to escape a bit!

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  14. I’ll have to spend some time looking through my shelves to see what I think would fit the genre, but I have to admit I like my mysteries to have a touch of Agatha Christie to them. In other words, I won’t have nightmares from reading them. That’s what many psychological suspense novels do to me, scare me silly. I spend my time yelling (in my head) at the characters to pay attention to what the killer said, did, etc. As the author pulls me deeper into the why of the killer’s motivations I generally end completely horrified. Yeah, I’m a big baby. 🙂

    I still manage to find myself standing in that aisle of the book store, so apparently I’m convinced that I’ll get over it.

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    • Debra, I love to be scared silly by books. I just hope I can manage to get that feeling across to my readers by the time I’m finished with my novel.

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  15. Oh yes, I meant to mention that I love the image you used for this post. It definitely evokes psychological suspense to me, but I couldn’t tell you why. 🙂

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  16. I attended a mystery writer’s conference a few years ago at which one of the discussions was about how “generous” this genre is. It allows writers to cover any topic or social issue, set the story in any time and place, and build any kind of character. Plot choices are wider than just the common who/why dunnit’s too. Psychological suspense fits nicely into such a broad and generous definition. Two wonderful psych suspense writers I’ve enjoyed are Tana French (In the Woods and Faithful Place) and Karin Fossum (He Who Fears the Wolf). Both include a who dunnit element in their stories. I’m very curious and intrigued by your novel now–hope I’ll get to read it someday soon.

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  17. I am with Geek Girl on both counts. I don’t think much about genre in general and I also use the word friggin’ 🙂

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    • Becc, friggin’ and it’s more explicit companion are such great words at times!

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    • Lorraine, as far as know the new plug-in for following comments seems to be working. Nobody has complained, so here’s to hoping it’s fixed.

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  18. I don’t know that I’ve read any psychological suspense books since I don’t recall knowing who did it at the beginning. The genre reminds me of that TV show Motive (although I never watched it) where they had to figure out why these people committed the crimes. I rather enjoy the whodunits with my brain trying to figure out the guilty party.

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  19. Really interesting post & genre is something I could discuss for hrs. I can relate to your dilemma over being turn between what you read and what you’re writing. And I’m not sure some if us want to be pigeonholed either. But I liked the whydunnit term. Patricia highsmith & Minette Walters spring to mind – particularly the latter. But frankly my old favorite the Blind Assassin also has elements of a psych thriller in it. So it’s really just not that clear cut. Sorry for delay in comment.

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    • Kathy, time will tell if Lost Girl Roads turns out to be psychological suspense. I certainly do seem drawn to characters with unstable mindsets (woe are the days gone by of my childhood!). I’ll look Walters up on Amazon. I also have the Blind Assassin on my reading list for this year thanks to the guest post you wrote for me a while ago.

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  20. And so many books can fit under multiple genres too! Eeeek! The lines can get blurred… but I know that no matter what the genre is, great writing like yours will always come out on top!

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    • Christy, genre lines do indeed blur. From a marketing perspective though it can be helpful to know what niche to best advertise a book in. Alas, marketing is this strange best I am gradually starting to better grasp.

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  21. All the discussion of genre makes my head spin a little bit. Think of how genre affects music. Do you want to spend all your time listening to one song after another that meets the definition of “smooth jazz” or. “adult alternative rock.” That’s boring. I always look for radio stations that surprise me. I think it’s the same way with books. Genre means predictability. From a reader perspective I don’t want to get stuck in a genre. And for a writer my approach would be to block it out until you’re done and then worry about the marketing stuff.

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    • Ken, genre does indeed equate to a level of predictability. I don’t read much genre fiction, but for those who do, it can be really disappointing when a book gets mislabeled, and they *gasp* encounter something outside of their genre comfort zone!

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  22. I gravitate toward the same genre.
    Give me a female who rises up from the depths and I’m there.
    I crave books like Gone Girl, Girl on a Train, She’s Come Undone, The Book of Ruth, Stones by the River…
    I kind of jump for joy.
    What kind of genre is this?
    “Women Rises?!”

    Great post, Ms. English! xx

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  23. But Jeri, what is this “genre” of which you speak? Don’t you know Socialist Realism is the only genre approved by the Party?

    “The writer is the engineer of the human soul.” –Joseph Stalin

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      • For Socialist Realism? To be honest, most of it’s pretty awful stuff, but the real classic of the form is Mikhail Sholokhov’s “And Quiet Flows the Don.” It’s about Cossacks and family life during World War One and the Revolution. (So it’s a lot more interesting than the standard Socialist Realist novel, which is usually more concerned with questions like “Comrades! How shall we raise production at our cement factory by 25 percent within the next five years?”)

        Most of the really great writing in Russia during the 20th century was either done in the 1920s (practically the only period in Russian history where there was a free press) or had to be smuggled over to the West to be published.

        I really like that Stalin quote, though.

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        • Thanks for the follow-up comment. I dunno, perhaps commentary on raising cement production can be made riveting in the hand of certain writers.

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  24. Interesting post, Jeri! Your novel sounds intriguing and I’m thrilled to hear you have dusted it off to continue your passion. I like the genre of psychological thriller. I would include The Silent Wife in that category. Honestly? I don’t care for the naming of a genre ‘psychological fiction’. It sounds unappealing, not to mention no fun at all (maybe that’s just me). So, I hope that doesn’t become ‘a thing’. I think of stories like the classic “Psycho” as a psychological thriller. Stephen King’s stories are amazing examples too.

    Now, you’ve got me curious Jeri as to just how many Genre’s are out there. Great post and I agree that an author should be as specific as possible about where to market their book.

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    • Lisa, I find I’m drawn to the label psychological fiction. It indicates a focus will be on the mindset of the character and their motivations, but not necessarily in a suspenseful or mysterious way. I’ll certainly see the movie version of The Silent Wife since Nicole Kidman will be in it, but I might have to read the book as well.

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  25. My second WIP is a psychological suspense. It’s far from finished, though. Like you, I’m diving into the psychological aspects of why my MC would do illegal activities.

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  26. I’m reading a book right now that is psychological suspense. However, I haven’t read a lot of this genre in the past, though maybe I should. I really enjoy that genre when it is done well.

    This is some really good business advice for writers. As someone who is married to a creative writer, I can say that writers don’t always want their writing constricted by business. They just want to express their creativity. But these are important matters to think about if you want people to actually see and enjoy your work.

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  27. I like a good psychological film with a big fat twist at the end; no horror, blood or paranormal for me.

    Gone Girl is a good example. I did not expect that film to touch on such deep rooted issues. I was constantly surprised when another twist came along.

    I have a habit of trying to identify the ending from an early stage.

    Writing, though enjoyable and rewarding is not at all easy.

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    • Phoenica, plot twists are awesome when they work and so hard to pull of when it comes to writing. I think that’s why I’ve struggled so much with my novel. This time it will either fall into place or I will move on to my next idea.

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  28. Ah, genre makes my head ache! I always want to say (and do believe to a great extent) that as long as the writing is good, then it doesn’t matter what the genre is. But … when it comes to what I choose to read, I gravitate to character-driven crime fiction, mysteries, and psychological suspense. I’m not a puzzler, needing to try and figure out who the criminal is before he or she is revealed at the end. Rather, knowing who the culprit is at the beginning adds a perverse element of entertainment as I read (or listen) through, wondering if and when the protagonist is going to figure it all out. Done well, psychological suspense will be character-driven; the crime, although not inconsequential, is there as a way to move the character development along.

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    • Mary, thank you for such a succinct comment 🙂 I can relate to coveting that “perverse element of entertainment” you mention.

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  29. Genre is a topic which fascinates me. I agree that crossing too many genres can be problematic for a writer wanting to get published but I also think that sometimes the slotting into genres can be too restrictive. As a reader, I enjoy a variety of genres, including literary fiction (whatever that is), standard mysteries and psychological suspense. I gravitate toward character-driven stories. I have a story I abandoned three years ago that I think I will be coming back to within the next year. It’s simmered in the back of my mind and I have some thoughts on what changes it needs.

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    • Donna, I think most stories can have a few genre labels applied to them, but for marketing purposes it’s best to focus on the predominant one when trying to find initial readers. Every now and again, I come across unseasoned writers who proclaim their book will be found in various sections of Barnes & Noble. That’s just not going to happen…

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  30. This post perfectly describes The Blindman of Seville by Robert Wilson. Oddly enough, it also describes Crime and Punishment, my first introduction to the psychology ‘genre’. For myself, I guess I write in a sci-fi-psychology-thriller sub-genre. Nice to have a name for it at last. 😀

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  31. I just re-read this post and I’m even more impressed than I was the first time around. Psychological suspense is a balancing act—somewhere between sleight of hand and the low boil of oreboding that creates suspense. Sometimes I manage to hit it, but it’s a challenge. One day, I hope to read Lost Girl Road.

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    • Candy, at times I think I might be better suited for other genres, but I do want to give Lost Girl Road one last push in the coming two years to see if I can do it justice.

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      • I have one of those books. I’ve written and re-written and re-written again… One day I will figure out how to make it work. Maybe all writers have that kind of book in their heads? It’s our great white whale…

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  32. Genre is very important. I’ve read books by self-published authors that don’t quite fit into their chosen genre. When an author mislabels their book, it can hurt them come reviews.

    I struggled with my genres. Since I’m a multi-genre writer, I have to dissect my books to make sure they’re going in the appropriate genre and sub-genre, along with making them stand out. I write down the themes in the book to help with some of the sub categories and/or promoting. I think I could have promoted my second book as a romantic comedy adventure instead of women’s fiction / contemporary romance. It’s more appealing.

    Best of luck to you on your submissions!

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    • Denise, there’s always time to go back and promote your book from another genre angle.

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  33. Writing non-fiction is so much easier! Seriously, from a reader perspective, I definitely lean toward mystery thriller, but just finished a Dean Koontz book that surely qualifies as a psychological thriller. Hum, where does that put books by writers like Stephen King – psychological horror? Because everything he writes is aimed at getting into your head. Interesting topic and enjoyed your added touch of humor Jeri. 🙂

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    • Marquita, psychological horror is an apt term for the genre King works within. I’m glad you enjoyed my humor. That side of me does occasionally get out in these posts, but not often 😉

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  34. I didn’t honestly think my first book fit in any category until one reviewer called it “reluctant detective” and I said “okay.” I like the title Lost Girl Road – it sounds like an intense read. I don’t read any particular genre over another – right now I’m reading Anthony Bourdain’s Kitchen Confidential (adventures in the culinary underbelly) which doesn’t really fit on the cookbook aisle but that’s where they put it.

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    • Jan, I love Bourdain and I loved Kitchen Confidential. I agree his title doesn’t necessarily fit into the cookbook aisle, but as a celebrity that’s his niche, along with the travel angle. Bourdain is actually quite the essayist in my eyes. He even has a Montaigne tattoo.

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  35. I think that writers not having a clear sense of where their book will best fit on a bookstore shelf is a total warning flag to agents. As in, don’t query an agent until you’re really, really clear on that. Like you said, self-pubbing seems to handle cross-genres more fluidly.

    Also, have you thought about writing “Lost Girl on a Train?”

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    • Laura, publishing after all is a business and genre a necessary marketing tool, regardless of the publishing path one takes. “Lost Girl on a Train” sounds like a freakin’ awesome mashup. I’ll get right on that 😉

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  36. I would think picking a genre and sticking to it would be one of the hardest things as an author. I tend to be all over the map! But I can understand why publishers would want to know that, and even if you’re self-publishing, people like to know what they’re getting.

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    • Meredith, I’ve gleaned from various sources that it takes 7-8 titles in the same genre for an independent author to start making a decent living. I don’t know if I’ll ever have that much focus when it comes to genre either.

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  37. You picked the perfect genre where your literary side does not have to sword fight your competitive side. Psychological Suspense sounds perfect for you.

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    • Stacy, I hope so too. Writing suspense is much harder than I had anticipated though. I need more practice!

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  38. Good explanation of genres and the whole psychological aspect of a good mystery. It is important to define what category your book belongs to. One of the worst books I ever read (shall remain nameless) went from being a cozy mystery about a ghost to erotically (that was a shock) and back again. Yikes. It was a good lesson to learn, though, where my own writing is concerned.

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    • Rose Mary, there is much to be learned from writing mistakes. Failing teaches us much more than not trying.

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  39. Thank you, Jeri, for this post helped me 🙂
    For me it has never been about liking or inclination to a specific genre for me it is which book do I connect with and then the bond with the book develops.
    Thank you for sharing dear, it’s good to learn 🙂

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    • Sushmita, your comment is the perfect support for going in and simply browsing all the aisles in a bookstore. I’ve often made some great finds that way for books I normally would not pick up otherwise.

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  40. Great topic Jeri! I love a psychological suspense. Silence of the Lambs, Cape Fear and Misery come to mind. All shiver-inducing stories.

    I also struggle with narrowing down the genre I write to just one. I always say I write women’s fiction/mystery/suspense. However, as I work on my next novel, which will be part of a series, I am writing with an eye to marketing it as a ‘cozy mystery’. The main character is a female, amateur sleuth. I think a comparable would be Sue Grafton’s Kinsey Millhone, at least that’s what I’m going for!

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    • Anne, how exciting to hear you are working on a cozy mystery series. I’ve been growing more fond of that genre by the minute.

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  41. It is interesting to learn about psychological suspense.
    I have always felt that genres are extensive in English… they include an assortment of features which might be related not only to the book itself but to the readers… This doesn´t happen in Spanish (It is harder to lose yourself in Book stores)
    It seems that “Gone Girl”, by Gillian Flynn is one of the most popular books of this sort … The example could be useul to understand the genre… or sub-genre, if we consider Mystery as genre.
    Furthermore, as it happens with crime novels: the end should resolve all loose ends, which seems to be a quite difficult thing to achieve…
    As to Non Fiction: I totally see you rocking that stage! 😀 It is a shame that non fiction doesn´t sell too much, though …
    Thanks for sharing, dear Jeri… always learning with you!

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    • Aqui, your comment makes me curious to explore bookstores in other countries now. Come to think of it, I did not do that on any of my overseas trips. I will have to make a point to do so whenever I take that sort of trip again.

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  42. Thank you for clarifying this, Jeri. I’ve been changing my genre around according to readers’ feedback, but after reading this I think my books fit best with psychological suspense, and I’m going to stick with that. I can’t wait to read yours!

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    • Christa, I go back and forth a lot on genre. Somedays I can stick with aiming for psychological suspense, and then the next day I change my mind. I’m currently leaning toward contemporary fiction with psychological undertones. Time will tell…

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